Anderson Silva Leaning On His Kids After Horrific Leg Injury

Great to see Anderson Silva leaning on his kids for support.

Hollywood Life

UFC fighter Anderson Silva is surrounded by his five kids after a leg-kick gone wrong in his Dec. 28 match resulted in gruesome, career-threatening broken bones. While his athletic future is still uncertain, he is comforted by his family’s positive attitude.

Family support is proving to be the best medicine for UFC fighter Anderson Silva. The injured fighter broke his leg when he fought Chris Weidman on Dec. 28, and went through surgery to set the bones, but shared a family photo to show he is taking comfort in having his wife, Dayane, three sons — Kalyl, Joao, and Gabriel — and two daughters — Koary and Kauana — with him during his rest and recovery.

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hip hop i am

if i could describe my flava, style, love, politics, and epistemological disposition i can sum it up by saying i am hip hop. full of bucking the status quo, putting a middle finger to the establishment, yet benefiting from what the establishment has to offer. i think much of my onto-epistemological disposition has to due with the year i was born. by being born in 1985 i was immersed in the the decade, well eight year reagan revolution that bolstered a war on drugs, cuts in safety nets, and the fall of the berlin wall. the first former item helped sweep up my mom and dad, the last latter item helped me visit both sides of berlin in 2010.

more than anything i was born to loving parents who were called off to duty in cells that look like prisons. that being said, my brothers, being of the hip hop positionality listened to the gamut of Kool Moe Dee’s, Easy E’s, 2 Live Crew’s, Big Daddy Kane’s, MC Lyte’s, Tupac’s, Dr. Dre’s, NWA’s, Public Enemie’s, Digable Planet’s.

man, how i loved hip hop growing up like i loved ninja turtles. hip hop gave me something that looked like me. church did as well, but at times church didn’t express my coolness. besides, grandma would yell at us for listening to that “cursing, loud, obscene, roguish music that made no sense.” talkin’ bout intergenerational warfare, music in our household came to a political struggle for which generation was legitimate. caught up in wadin’ in the water, i was always “cool like dat”

i resolve, to my core i am a child of god. to my core i am hip hop. more importantly, cool like dat i am!

Incredible Lightness

Incredible Lightness

When Cooper Union rejected him for grad school, Turrell enrolled at the University of California, Irvine, where he began experimenting with light projections. His education was interrupted in 1966, however, when he was arrested in an FBI sting for advising potential draftees on how to avoid the Vietnam War. Turrell served a brief prison sentence. He doesn’t miss being incarcerated—”I wasn’t Gandhi”—but he’s nostalgic for other aspects of the era, including the interfaith coalition of the antiwar movement: “Radical Catholics poured blood on the [draft files]. Then the Quakers said, ‘We’ll clog up your jails.’ It was wonderful Jewish lawyers who got the Quakers out of jail.”

 

Learning to Speak Brazinglish

I feel this article. Living in South Korea, I grew accustom to Konglish, Korean and English mixed. Some of sayings were absolutely classic: When I was teaching at the public education university in Jinju City my students would say things like “Teacher, my head is sick,” or something like “Tonight I am going to play with friends.” Mostly these Konglish terms were strict translations from Korean to English, but to me it always made no sense until I started studying the language. “Teacher, my head is sick,” translated to English meaning “I have a hangover or I have a really bad headache.” The other, “Tonight I am going to play with friends,” translated to “Tonight I am going to hang out with my friends”

The experience above, set me up for a whole new world of language blending when I went to Brazil this past summer to learn three things: 1. Would Brazil be ready for the World Cup. 2. About richness of Brazilian culture including food, language, people, and history. 3. Brazilian Portuguese! Check out this article on “Learning to Speak Brazinglish”

Reviews by Josmar Lopes

By VANESSA BARBARA

November 8, 2013

Our guest columnist for the month is São Paulo-born Vanessa Barbara. A novelist, translator and columnist for the Brazilian newspaper Folha de São Paulo, Vanessa edits the literary website A Hortaliça (www.hortifruti.org). Her article, “Learning to Speak Brazinglish,” is a masterful semi-serious, tongue-in-cheek tome in which she discusses Brazil’s precarious preparations for the upcoming 2014 World Cup.

Brazilians are trying hard to get ready to host the 2014 FIFA World Cup.

Despite having a big territory rich with natural scenery, Brazil is not accustomed to many international visitors. The World Tourism Organization, which ranks tourist spending in different countries, puts it 39th on the list, behind much smaller countries like Lebanon, Croatia and Malaysia. Next year, the government expects tourism spending in Brazil to grow by 55 percent, thanks largely to the World Cup.

But as that time draws near, the general feeling…

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reflectin’ on da PhD.

how can i say this with sounding cocky? i will just say it. i survived y’all. this semester i survived taking 3 doctoral classes and 1 undergraduate course. for the doctoral courses i took statistics for educators, leadership for the public good, and theorizing gender and sexuality. each one of those course kicked my ass, keeping me up to 3 and 4am each evening. sorry to my passed on grandmothers for cussing. needless to say, i survived this tumultuous cycle that i purposefully signed up for. prior to entering the semester my advisor warned against this because on top of taking these course i would be teaching 2 sections of the sociocultural foundations course.

in relfection, i should have listened. my advisor is a brilliantly smart, african american who is pound for pound one of the best humans i’ve met since february 28th 1985, the day i was born. well the doctor i met first was pretty legit. and my parents they were cool, kinda corny sometimes, but overall they are mad nice folks.

i was speaking with this same professor the other day while we were plannin’ a course for next semester and she told me str8 up that i was hardheaded. i had this moment that i always do with folks tell me something i already know and have known for two decades now. it’s like the old adage goes, or what my first philosophers would tell me as a kid “a hard head makes a soft ass.”

besides completin’ four courses which i scored 2 a’s in and 2 b’s, i taught 2 courses. and today i checked out my overall evaluations. these evaluations showed i was right on par with the rest of my teaching cohort.

what does this mean for me? it means its time to celebrate, then rethink the revolution.

JJ

A new perspective on the “affluenza” case: Sergio Molina’s story

What is this thing called Affluenza? We have to pray for this family. #sergiomolina

Anderson Cooper 360

A judge in Texas sentenced 16-year-old Ethan Couch to ten years of probation for the crash that killed four people. His lawyers argued he is a victim of a so-called condition called ‘affluenza,’ a theory that Couch isn’t really to blame for his actions because his rich parents never set limits for him and he never learned about consequences. Sergio Molina was riding in the back of Couch’s truck that night. He survived the accident, but he is suffering unimaginable consequences and his life will never be the same. Gary Tuchman has his story.

 

Anderson discussed this case with criminal defense attorney Brian Wice, Senior Legal Analyst Jeffrey Toobin and Syracuse University professor Boyce Watkins.
[cnn-video url=http://www.cnn.com/video/data/2.0/video/bestoftv/2013/12/14/ac-panel-affluenza.cnn.html]

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